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Graduate education in Sub-Saharan Africa: prospects and challenges

Hayward, F

Abstract:
Higher education in Africa in the 1960s and 1970s pictured excitement, creativity, and pride—given that faculty members dedicated to teaching were involved in innovative research, and many helped lay the foundations for governance and development. Quality was high, and universities held in great esteem. Most students were eager scholars, exhilarated by their good fortune, and certain they were destined for leadership roles. And a start was made on graduate programs. By the early 1980s, the picture was different for most universities—including budget shortfalls in declining national economic circumstances, repression, curtailed academic freedom, civil unrest, and loss of status. Donor interest shifted to primary education, and external funding declined from US$103 million annually as late as 1994, dropping to an average of US$30.8 million from 1995 to 1999.

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Title of Paper: Graduate education in Sub-Saharan Africa: prospects and challenges
Publisher: The Boston Collegae Centre for International Higher Education
City: Boston


Date:2012
Document Type:Other
Subject Area:Contributory Studies and Research Approaches
Country:African Continent
Keywords:Higher Education, Higher Education and Development, Graduates, Postgraduate Education, Postgraduate Research


Date Added:31 January 2012


Graduate education in Sub-Saharan Africa: prospects and challenges