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The Arab spring: a higher education revolution that is yet to happen

Mazawi, André Elias

Abstract:
The overthrow of the Tunisian and Egyptian rulers, following widespread demonstrations for regime change—subsequently, spreading from Algeria to Yemen, as well as to Libya, Syria, Jordan, and Bahrain—has raised hopes for a new political dawn across the Arab region. Likened to a “volcano” by some observers, protest movements call for new forms of citizenship and for the establishing of new bases of state legitimacy. Commentators refer to a long overdue “political spring.” Others invoke the notion of a “renaissance” or a renewed “Arab awakening.” Others, still, refer to a watershed of “revolutions” ushering in new forms of politics, attuned to questions of human rights and public participation. In response, reform initiatives have been frenetically introduced by ruling elites in their attempts to contain and navigate the ensuing legitimacy crisis. At this juncture, one wonders how do the unfolding political upheavals across the Arab region and the reform initiatives introduced by besieged ruling elites affect state–higher education relations more particularly?

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Document Title: The Arab spring: a higher education revolution that is yet to happen
Journal: International Higher Education
Volume: 59
Issue: Spring
No. of Pages: 12-13


Document Type:Journal Article (Peer Reviewed)
Subject Area:Contributory Studies and Research Approaches
Country:International
Keywords:Academic Development, Academic Performance, Arab Countries, Higher Education, Higher Education and Development, Political Change, Political Activism, Politics, Productivity


File Size:92 KB
Date Added:29 September 2011


The Arab spring: a higher education revolution that is yet to happen