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What knowledge is of most worth for the millenial citizen?

Muller, Johan

Abstract:
In this paper, Johan Muller attempts to answer the question " What knowledge is of most worth for the millennial citizen? ". He maintains that the answers fall into one of two mutually exclusive categories, one which encompasses cultural and moral knowledge and skills and the second provides an answer in terms of skills and knowledge for economic productivity. The author claims that the global economy and the rise of neo-liberal consensus demands answers to the questions " What are the skills required to produce economic innovation?" and " What skills are relevant to competative advantage?"  The response of educators to these questions are discussed and an analyses of the concept of " knowledge " is included. The author identifies two modes of knowledge production distinguishing between Mode 1 and Mode 2 knowledge. The advantages of Mode 2 knowledge are stated followed by the author's arguments on whether this mode is realistic or not. Muller devotes an entire discussion to the author Gibbons' theory on the relationship between Mode 1 and Mode 2 learning followed by his own concluding remarks.

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Chapter Title: What knowledge is of most worth for the millenial citizen?
City: Pretoria, Cape Town
Publisher: HSRC Press


Date:2000
Document Type:Chapter in Book (Peer Reviewed)
Subject Area:Teaching and Learning
Country:South Africa
Keywords:South Africa, Knowledge Production, Mode 2 Knowledge Production, Curriculum, Curriculum Planning, Academic Freedom, Neoliberalism, Theory, Skills, Problem Based Learning PBL


File Size:147 KB
Rights:Permission to reproduce chapter granted by HSRC Press
Date Added:08 February 2007


Muller, Johan (2000). What knowledge is of most worth for the millenial citizen? In Andre Kraak ( ed. ) New knowledge production and its implications for higher education in South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa: HSRC Press, 70-87