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Higher education in Ethiopia: the vision and its challenges

Saint, William

Abstract:
Ethiopia is embarked on a higher education expansion and reform programme of impressive dimensions. Expansion will create new universities, establish three system support agencies, mount new courses, and triple enrolments. Reforms introduce increased institutional autonomy, curriculum revisions, new funding arrangements and student contributions by means of a graduate tax. This article analyses current higher education reform efforts in Ethiopia. It begins by sketching the social context in which higher education is situated and describing the country’s higher education system. An assessment of tertiary education financing follows. Management capacities and efficiency in the use of these resources are then discussed, noting the particular challenges posed by HIV/AIDS. Educational quality and relevance are subsequently addressed. Analysis points out potential weaknesses in the reform programme but concludes that enrolment expansion targets are likely to be met. However, the dynamics of expansion may well generate difficulties in maintaining educational quality.

Full text available as: http://www.codesria.org/Links/Publications/jhea3_04/saint.pdf

 


Document Title: Higher education in Ethiopia: the vision and its challenges
Journal: Journal of Higher Education in Africa
Volume: 2
Issue: 3
No. of Pages: 83-113


Document Type:Journal Article (Peer Reviewed)
Subject Area:National Systems and Comparative Studies
Country:Ethiopia
Keywords:Higher Education, Higher Education and Development, Ethiopia, Reforms of Higher Education, Economic Factors, Demography, Financing of Higher Education, HIV AIDS, Student Enrolment, Quality of Higher Education


File Size: Bytes
Date Added:24 April 2008


Saint, William (2004). Higher education in Ethiopia: the vision and its challenges, Journal of Higher Education in Africa 2(3): 83-113