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System performance and sustainability of higher education in Nigeria

Osinubi, Tokunbo Simbowale

Abstract:

It has been asserted that Nigeria’s education system has not been performing at the standard expected of it and that its performance is on the decline.  There is no question about the importance of education to national development. Issues of concern are the policy thrusts of government, the management of resources within the educational sector, and the attitude of the participants in the sector (administrators, staff and students). Particularly troubling is the fact that, despite massive funds injected into education (albeit inadequate), the latter does not seem to have benefited much. Or at least has not responded in a way that would show it has received positive impetus from increased funding. The objective of this article is to look at the issues involved, to identify and analyse the main factors working against positive system performance and to make suggestions on system adaptability with a view to ensuring sustainability and averting total collapse. It concentrates on the higher educational system in Nigeria.  The author concludes that the collapse of Nigeria's education system is imminent and makes a few recommendations that may avert this problem.   

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Document Title: System performance and sustainability of higher education in Nigeria
Journal: Higher Education Policy
Volume: 16
Issue: 3
No. of Pages: 301-311


Document Type:Journal Article (Peer Reviewed)
Subject Area:National Systems and Comparative Studies
Country:Nigeria
Keywords:Sustainability, Higher Education, Nigeria, Policy, Education Systems, Management


File Size:74 KB
Rights:This is the author's post sprint.
Date Added:22 April 2008


Osinubi, Tokunbo Simbowale (2003). System performance and sustainability of higher education in Nigeria, Higher Education Policy 16(3): 301-311