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Research training: the Kenyan experience

Wandiga, Shem O.

Abstract:
In this chapter, the author stresses the importance of research as a solution to social and economic challenges.  Research survives if society appreciates and supports scientists in their efforts to achieve this.  Wandiga maintains that many developing countries, including Kenya, lacks sufficient infrastructure to facilitate research practice.  Scientific output from the Third World reflects the huge difference in research quality between developed and developing countries. The author asserts that the establishment of infrastructure alone would not create a successful research and science based community, as such infrastructure needs to be sustained and maintained.  However, economic turmoil has had a negative impact on human resources development and this paper describes and explains the efforts that Kenya has made to alleviate this situation.          

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Chapter Title: Research training: the Kenyan experience
Book Title: Research training for development-proceedings of a conference on research training for countries with limited research capacities
Edited by: Erik Thulstrup & Hans Thulstrup
City: Roskilde, Denmark
Publisher: Roskilde University Press
No. of Pages: 145-151


Date:1996
Document Type:Chapter in Book (Peer Reviewed)
Subject Area:Research
Country:Kenya
Keywords:Research Training, Kenya, Universities, Research Institutions, International Cooperation


File Size:40 KB
Rights:Permission to reproduce this chapter was granted by the publisher, Roskilde University Press
Date Added:26 March 2008


Wandiga, Shem O. (1996). Research training: the Kenyan experience In Erik Thulstrup & Hans Thulstrup (eds) Research training for development-proceedings of a conference on research training for countries with limited research capacity Denmark: Roskilde University Press, 145-151