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Financing higher education in post-apartheid South Africa: trends, developments, and challenges ahead

Ishengoma, Johnson

Abstract:

The transformation of higher education in post-apartheid South Africa is accompanied by an equally transformed education policy system which regulates its funding. New guidelines ensure that inequalities which existed during the apartheid era, have been eliminated. This paper describes higher education financing in  post -apartheid South Africa and identifies trends, developments and challenges ahead. The author discusses the racially fragmented higher education system of pre-1994 South Africa by referring to the differentiation between universities and technikons, and public and private higher education. The paper describes in detail the finance mechanisms that government is providing for higher education, statistics of government contribution towards the national student loan programme, as well as problems and challenges that are faced by the South African higher education system. 

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Title of Paper: Financing higher education in post-apartheid South Africa: trends, developments, and challenges ahead


Date:2002
Document Type:Paper
Subject Area:Finance and Physical Resources
Country:South Africa
Keywords:South African Universities, Post Apartheid, Financial Aid, Higher Education and the State, Higher Education Institutions HEI s, Transformation of higher education, Funding of Higher Education, Student Loan Schemes, National Student Financial Aid Scheme NSFAS


File Size:80 KB
Rights:The International Comparative Higher Education Finance and Accessibility Project
Date Added:18 January 2007


Ishengoma,J. ( 2002 ). Financing higher education in post-apartheid South Africa: trends, developments and challenges ahead The International Comparative Higher Education Finance and Accessibility Project, Graduate School of Education, University of Buffalo, SUNY.