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Restore, reform but do not transform: the gender politics of higher education in Africa

Mama, Amina

Abstract:
This paper uses gender analysis to reflect on the emergence and development of higher education in Africa. The available statistical picture indicates that despite the absence of formal exclusions, women’s entry into higher educational institutions—as students and as employees—has remained slow and uneven, suggesting the need to look beyond the numbers. The overall pattern of exclusion and marginalization is true for both administrative and academic tracks but is at its most extreme for senior academic and research positions. The persistence of extreme gender inequality is most easily and often attributed to external social and familial factors. Here, however, it is argued that there is sufficient evidence to suggest that, despite institutional and managerial claims of administrative neutrality, the institutional and intellectual cultures of African institutions are, in fact, permeated with sexual and gender dynamics.

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Title of Paper: Restore, reform but do not transform: the gender politics of higher education in Africa


Date:2003
Document Type:Conference Paper
Subject Area:National Systems and Comparative Studies
Country:African Continent
Keywords:Gender Politics, Higher Education, Gender Inequality, Access to Higher Education, Women in Higher Education, Staff


File Size:186 KB
Date Added:28 September 2007


Mama, Amina (2003). Restore, reform but do not transform: the gender politics of higher education in Africa. Journal of Higher Education in Africa 1(1):101-125